Finalists Design Challenge 2015

Winners of the Design for Additive Manufacturing Challenge 2015

On Wednesday March 4th, Prof. Brent Stucker, Chairman of the Jury announced the winners of the Additive World Design for Additive Manufacturing Challenge 2015. From a group of 34 contestants, both professionals and students, 3 finalists were selected per category.

The two winners that succeeded best at achieving the assignment to redesign an existing product for additive manufacturing: 

  • Team e-Move optimised the design of the swing arm of an electric motorcycle for weight, reduced the number of parts from 16 to 1 and simultaneously increased the reliability by integrating the brake line into the frame.
  • Team ‘Cooling with Heat’ from Bremen University demonstrated the large design freedom that comes with 3D printing to make an innovative heat exchanger inspired by nature. This cooling system converts heat produced by the computer’s CPU to electricity used to power the cooling fan. The complexity of the small channels in the redesigned part is only possible to make using 3D printing and illustrate very well what this new technology has to offer 

​The winners took home the latest Ultimaker 3D printer, a free licence of Altair’s design optimization software and a 3D metal printed Additive World Award by AddLab. 

                       

Winner professional category:                                                             Winner Student category:
Gilbert Peters of Team e-Move                                                            Jonas Deitschun of Team 'Cooling with Heat', Bremen University

 

Finalists Design Challenge 2015 demonstrate potential industrial 3D printing
Professionals and students redesign products for a broad range of applications

On Wednesday February 11th, Additive Industries announced the finalists of Additive World Design for Additive Manufacturing Challenge 2015. From a group of 34 contestants, both professionals and students, 3 finalists were selected per category. ‘The redesigns submitted from all over the world (USA, Canada, Netherlands, Belgium, France, Germany and India) demonstrate perfectly how product designs can be improved when the freedom of 3D printing is applied’, says Daan Kersten, co-founder and CEO of Additive Industries. The large variation of industrial applications confirms the growing interest for additive manufacturing of multiple industries.

The products redesigned for additive manufacturing by the finalists show a broad range of opportunities. The selected designs are from the medical field (hip implant), automotive industry (suspension for electric motorcycle), consumer market (pepper mill), high tech industry (vacuum seal), aerospace (turbine frame) and electronics (computer cooling). The products clearly illustrate the freedom of the designer, potential to reduce the number of parts or integrate them, the possibility to create lighter structures and vary the material properties within a part. On Wednesday evening March 4th, professor Brent Stucker (Louisville, USA), chairman of the jury, will announce the winners at the Additive World Awards Dinner in Eindhoven, The Netherlands.

 

The designs are (from left to right, first top row then bottom):

  • Ali Aldubaisi (USA): Hip implant (student)
  • Settels Savenije Van Amelsvoort (NL): Self sealing vacuum seal (professional)
  • Team E-Move (NL): Swing arm for electric motorcycle (professional)
  • Christoph Le Blanc (D): Small turbine frame (student)
  • Team Cooling with Heat (D): Computer cooling unit (student)
  • Team Spartacus3D (F): Pepper mill (professional)

Finalists category: professionals

  • The professionals of Spartacus3D from France show how a redesigned pepper mill with moving parts can be 3D printed in one go without any assembly. 
  • The Dutch team of E-Move optimised the design of the rear suspension of their electric motorcycle and integrated the brake line combining weight reduction, increased durability and a reduction of production process steps.
  • Third finalist of the professionals category is the Dutch engineering firm Settels Savenije Van Amelsvoort. They integrated thin walled channels for vacuum creating a self-sealing vacuum seal replacing a large number of bolts needed for exact mounting.

Finalists category: students

  • The German team ‘Cooling with Heat’ used the large design freedom that comes with 3D printing to make an innovative heat exchanger inspired by nature. This cooling system converts heat produced by computer electronics to energy used to power the cooling fan. 
  • American student Ali Aldubaisi has designed an improved hip implant capitalising on the option additive manufacturing offers to combine different material structures and densities in one part. This allowed him to create a structure resembling more a real human bone and improving both friction and wear performance.
  • Christophe Le Blanc from Germany used topology optimization software to create a light weight and stronger structure simultaneously substantially reducing the number of components (15 to 1). This also increased the durability of the turbine frame. The topology software supports the designer to decide where material is functionally needed and where you can lose the material. This generates typical bionic structures we know from nature.

The Jury

Mr Brent Stucker (Chairman); Chief Executive Officer and a co-founder of 3DSIM LLC
Mr Filip Geerts: Director General of CECIMO (European Association of the Machine Tool Industries)
Mr Erik de Bruijn: Co-founder Ultimaker
Mr Michal Wanski: Account manager Altair
Mr Rein van der Mast: Manager Design & Engineering at Additive Industries and AddLab

Finalists and jury
From left to right: Rein van der Mast (Additive Industries), Dorine Laheij (STTLS), Charles de Forges (Spartacus 3d), Erik de Bruijn (Ultimaker), Gilbert Peters (e-Move), Brent Stucker (3D Sim), Christophe Blanc (Materialise), Jonas Deitschun (Bremen University), Michal Wanski (Altair), Giorgio Magistrelli (Cecimo).

Additive World Partners